Residential Seminars and Summer Institutes

Residential seminars and summer institutes are intensive professional development courses that take place in s short period of time, often over the summer. They can provide an overview or East Asian history and culture or focus on a specific theme. These courses can provide professional development hours to teachers; in some cases, graduate credit will be available.

 

Teaching East Asian Literature in the High School Workshop

Start Date: July 9, 2017
End Date: July 14, 2017
Time Detail: Sunday through Friday, 8:00a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Location: Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405
Type of Course: Residential Seminars and Summer Institutes
Audience: High school English and World Literature teachers (all states) who are interested in incorporating Chinese, Japanese, and Korean literature into their curriculum.
Course Description: Each day professors will lead lectures and discussions of the literature and history of China, Japan, and Korea. Every afternoon a high school world literature teacher experienced in teaching East Asian literature will lead strategy sessions on how to teach the works at the high school level. Evening activities and film screenings are also included for further cultural enrichment.

Participation includes:
· Set of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean literary works covered in workshop (mailed to participants prior to workshop)
· Free lodging at the Indiana Memorial Union Biddle Hotel
· At least one meal a day
· Certificate of completion
· Option to purchase three graduate credits from Indiana University
· $300 school resource-buying grant for purchasing East Asian literature for classroom use, provided upon completion of all requirements
· Access to curricular resources on the workshop’s Google website
Registration and Info:

-Application available at:

http://www.indiana.edu/~easc/outreach/educators/literature/documents/2017Papyrusonlineapplication.pdf

– For more information, please visit: http://www.indiana.edu/~easc/outreach/educators/literature/index.shtml

Offered to: All States

Critical Issues in Contemporary China

Start Date: July 10, 2017
End Date: July 14, 2017
Time Detail: Monday through Friday, 8:30a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Location: University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309
Type of Course: Residential Seminars and Summer Institutes
Audience: Secondary social studies, history, Asian studies, geography, government teachers.
Course Description: As China continues its emergence as a global power, the complexities of governing and living in China remain immense. The country’s recent economic slowdown, the government’s increasingly authoritarian practices, and the uncertainties with changing political landscapes abroad have raised questions about a sustained “peaceful rise,” to use President Xi Jinping’s oft-quoted phrase. Comprehending the complex issues that define contemporary China is essential for teachers and students today. This five-day residential institute will explore some of the most critical issues facing China today, including political changes, economic development, environmental degradation, demographic trends, social inequalities, and regional security. Participants will work with China specialists to develop a well-rounded understanding of contemporary China and gain exemplary resources to use in the classroom.

Participation includes:

· Travel stipend
· Dormitory/meal package
· Resource materials
· Certificate of completion
· Option to purchase two graduate credits from University of Colorado Continuing Education
· Stipend for follow-up dissemation
· Access to curricular resources on the workshop’s Google website
Registration and Info:

Click HERE for more information.

Offered to: All States

Neighborhoods in Japan

Start Date: July 10, 2017
End Date: July 14, 2017
Time Detail: 8:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Location: The University of Washington in Seattle
Type of Course: Residential Seminars and Summer Institutes
Audience: The seminar application is open to all grade 2-8 educators who plan to apply the content in their classes. Preference will be given to educators who are currently employed full-time in a public or private school based in the United States. Pre-service educators must be currently enrolled in a teacher education program. Substitutes are not eligible to apply. Applications will be evaluated on potential classroom impact, which you will have a chance to discuss in your application.
Course Description: Neighborhoods in Japan will use stories, videos, and images to build an understanding of community life in Japan today. The seminar's guiding question will be "How can we introduce our students to diverse stories of life in Japan?" In addition to exploring a rich variety of resources, the week will focus on adapting content and materials for use in your grade 2-8 classroom.
Registration and Info:

For more information click here.

Offered to: All States

East Asian Philosophies and Religions: A Visual and Literary Introduction

Start Date: July 24, 2017
End Date: July 28, 2017
Time Detail: 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. (Monday-Thursday) / 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m (Friday)
Location: University of Washington in Seattle
Type of Course: Residential Seminars and Summer Institutes
Audience: The seminar is open to K–12 educators who plan to apply the content in their history, social studies, language arts, art, library/media, East Asian languages, or other relevant courses. Preference is given to educators who are currently employed full-time in a public or private school based in the U.S. Pre-service educators must be currently enrolled in a teacher education program. Substitutes are not eligible to apply. Applications will be evaluated on potential classroom impact, which you will have a chance to discuss in your application.
Course Description: East Asian Philosophies and Religions: A Visual and Literary Introduction will explore the key philosophical and religious traditions that underlie East Asian belief systems, historically as well as in the present. Our course of study will focus on the emergence of Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, and Shinto within their original contexts, but will also consider how these traditions evolved as they moved across space and time. We will examine art and literature to familiarize ourselves with each tradition’s associated doctrines, objects and places of worship, and practices. As we analyze these sources, we will pay special attention to the impacts of cultural transmission, both on the traditions themselves and East Asian cultures they influenced.
Registration and Info:

For more information, CLICK HERE.

Offered to: All States